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Posts tagged ent3dprinting
Intern Insights: The Summer at a Glance

(Rhea Braun)

When I came down to Philadelphia for the first time in my life at the beginning of the summer, I wasn’t sure what to expect. All I knew was that when I had interviewed for an internship at TJU, Bon asked me to help out with a bit of troubleshooting for some Bluetooth sensors. As an engineer at Princeton, I had taken a couple of computer science courses, so I decided to give it a shot. When I first stepped into the vault, I was amazed. It was a treasure trove of cool tech - outfitted with six 3D printers, a whole deck of circuitry, a special STL printer, and even an Oculus Rift, I knew I was in for a fun ride. However, work came first, and after an initial session of design thinking training we started our work on the smarterPlay project.

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Summer Projects: ENT 3D Printing

In the Health Design Lab, there are always several projects going on at once. Whether that’s the smarterPLAY project looking at how community members use playgrounds and public space, or rehearsal of design thinking workshops, there’s constantly something interesting happening. One project that’s currently moving at a lightning fast pace, is our Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) 3D Printing Project. This project focuses on a surgery called mandibular reconstruction during which a part of the mandible is removed, leaving a gap in the bone that has to be supported by a metal plate. This plate must be manually bent and re-bent so it fits into the patients jaw just right; this process can take up to 45 minutes and is common practice in most operating rooms.

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Intern Insights: A Summer of Design Thinking and 3D Printing

(Nick Rankin)

At only week 7 it really is amazing how far we have come. Having finished my first year of medical school, this summer has been a whirlwind learning experience and I feel well on track to accomplish the goals I set for myself. One of our first projects, working with the ENT department, started out as a specific task requested by an ENT resident, but it seemed interesting so Denis and I put our names down.  We thought we were going to whip up a few jaws as models for the ENT department. We couldn’t have expected that the initial impression our models had on the ENT resident and attendings would uncork a volley of ideas.

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